Catherine Taft’s Top 10 Shows in L.A.: October 2010

Erika Vogt “Geometric Persecution”
Overduin and Kite
September 12 – October 23, 2010
http://www.overduinandkite.com/

It has been several years since Vogt last showed in Los Angeles, but just five months since her work was on view at this year’s Whitney Biennial. In this long overdue L.A. show, Vogt presents a series of new drawings and a video work that continue her skillful conflation of digital and analog media.

Allen Ruppersberg: No Time Left to Start Again
Margo Leavin Gallery
September 16 – October 23, 2010
http://www.margoleavingallery.com
Ruppersberg, a second generation L.A. conceptual artist, presents another take on his painstaking process of collecting, interpreting and resituating pop Americana. In some works, the artists even pays tribute to some of L.A.’s mythic and legendary artists like Bas Jan Ader, Wolfgang Stoerchle, and John Baldessari.

Wally Hedrick
The Box
September 17 – October 23, 2010
http://www.theboxla.com
The late Wally Hedrick was arguably the king of the Bay Area beats (and he certainly is the most underrated of that milieu). In their second solo exhibition of Hedrick’s work, The Box presents several large scale painting that emphasize the artist’s pointed political stance, a definitive characteristic of his practice and life.

David Noonan
David Kordansky
September 18, 2010 – October 23, 2010
http://www.davidkordanskygallery.com
David Noonan combines collage, photography and silkscreen to produce his smoky, dramatic and always captivating canvases. This group of large-scale works addresses the trappings of theater and theatricality, a long-time focus for the artist that always appears surprising and new.

KALUP LINZY
Fantasies, Melodramas, and a Dream called Love
20 September – 23 October 2010
http://www.ltdlosangeles.com/
Apart from his collaborations with actor turned artist James Franco, Kalup Linzy maintains a strong and provocative art practice. His performances and videos are both product and parody of American media—sitcoms, cell phone commercials, soap operas, R&B songs, etc.—and his new series of collages further dig into cultural signifiers, race and entertainment.

MARIUS BERCEA QUI VIVRA VERRA
Francois Ghebaly Gallery
September 18 – October 23, 2010
http://ghebaly.com/exhibition-detail/1520
In September, Francois Ghebaly moved from his long time hold in Chinatown to the growing gallery district of Culver City. His inaugural exhibition brings a welcome energy into the neighborhood with a series of delicately painted cityscapes by Romanian-born artist Marius Bercea.

Emma Gray HQ
September 18 – October 21

Directly above Ghebaly Gallery is art consultant Emma Gray’s HQ, an office/exhibition/hang-out space that offers sneak peeks at new artworks, often in advance of any formal gallery presentation. Gray’s first “show” features photographer Zoe Crosher, conceptual artist John Bucklin and music world interloper Jason Yates’ “Black Monk Tables.”

Torbjorn Rodland
Michael Benevento
September 16 – October 30, 2010
http://www.beneventolosangeles.com/
The photographs Rodland makes are as touching as they are eerie. For this exhibition titled “A Black Ant Traveling,” the artist presents a tight group of images that represent moody slices of his native Northern European culture.

JERRY/JURY-RIGGED curated by Jan Tumlir
Glendale College Art Gallery
September 25 – November13, 2010
http://seco.glendale.edu/artgallery/current%20exhibition.html
Writer, curator and teacher has long been offering L.A. thoughtful and carefully organized exhibitions. His latest edition, Jerry/Jury-Rigged brings together twelve stellar L.A. artists, from young practitioners like Amanda Ross-Ho and Jeff Ostergren to veterans like Chris Burden and Skip Arnold.

EVA HESSE SPECTRES 1960
Hammer Museum
September 25 – January 2, 2011
http://hammer.ucla.edu/exhibitions/detail/exhibition_id/191

This long anticipated exhibition features nineteen rarely seen quasi-figurative canvases by the artist. When exhibited next to her well known minimalist and materialist sculptures, these early works (produced when Hesse was just 24) provide a painterly context to Hesse’s deeply introspective practice.

About the author

Catherine Taft
Catherine Taft is a Los Angeles based critic and curator. Her essays on contemporary art and culture appear regularly in publications including Artforum, Modern Painters, ArtReview, Metropolis-M, Kaleidoscope, and in exhibition catalogs in the U.S. and abroad. In addition to her writing, Taft is Curatorial Associate in the department of Architecture and Contemporary Art the Getty Research Institute, where she helped organize the 2008 exhibition, California Video and is currently working on Pacific Standard Time: Art in Los Angeles 1945-1980 (Fall 2011).

One Comment

  1. Nic says:

    Congrats to Francois ! Can’t wait to see the new gallery!

    Reply

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